Florida firm will oversee multisport complex at $1B Bluhawk project in Overland Park !

Are winter sports safe with COVID numbers continuing to climb ?

Are winter sports safe with COVID numbers continuing to climb ?

BILOXI, Miss. – As COVID cases climb, concern also grows about the future of winter sports. State health officials say close-contact sports can contribute to dangerous virus-spreading.

“The CDC had a recent analysis of a hockey outbreak. They had two teams. One person gave it to 22 people on one hockey team. That’s pretty appalling,” said State Health Officer Doctor Thomas Dobbs. “I think yes, it is quite likely that it is more dangerous. There’s less people on the court, the proximity, the indoor nature of it, the less airflow is intrinsically more concerning.”

His concerns were also echoed by State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“Basketball is a particular concern. We’ve seen clusters and outbreaks in basketball teams and we’re worried about that. some cases school have had to quarantine those teams,” said Byers. “Some schools have decided to cancel basketball because of the high-risk nature”

It is that high-risk nature that has some calling for the season to be postponed, but many of the fans refuse to support that idea. Some are even asking, if football can go on with larger crowds, why can’t basketball?

“They shouldn’t cancel it at all. Why cancel young kids playing basketball and having fun?” said Willie R. Manning of Biloxi. “This is what they want to do. This is their dream. They want to come out here and have as much fun as possible. So this is some of their last year, so why not let them play ball. They played football, so why not? You played volleyball? You’re going to play soccer, they are going to play everything else, just limit the people that come inside and I believe everything will be alright.”

If the sport taking place inside is the problem, one fan suggested taking it outside.

“Take it to the blacktop, why not? It is only fair to the kids, with all the hard work they put in they deserve this,” said Kyle Cruso of Biloxi.

Some believe enough safety precautions are already in place.

“You love to see the crowd, spaced out with our masks on, safety first,” said Moss Point parent Carla Carter.

As of now, the winter sports season is moving ahead as scheduled for schools in South Mississippi.

The game between Gulfport and Pascagoula was canceled earlier this week after someone on the Panthers tested positive for COVID, said Gulfport school officials.

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The Loss of One Youth or Amateur Sports Tournament Costs a City an Average of $360,000 in Hotel Revenue !

New data from EventConnect reveals the enormous economic impact on cities from the loss of youth or amateur sports tournaments due to COVID-19


LONDON, Ontario – [Canada] Today, EventConnect, the leading provider of event and sports tourism management software, announced findings showing the significant economic impact felt by cities from the loss of youth and amateur sports tournaments a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings from EventConnect’s internal database of over 4,000 events, 400 associations, 15,000 hotels, and 800 cities revealed that the cancellation of just one tournament costs a city an average of $360,000. However, the cancellation of a big tournament can result in a city losing as much as $5,074,185 in a single weekend. The US cities that have so far been hit the hardest in 2020 due to the pandemic’s cancellations are Mauston, Wisconsin; Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin; Georgetown, Delaware; Boston, Massachusetts; Fort Wayne, Indiana; and Buffalo, New York.

However, as restrictions on tournaments vary between the states, those states expecting to see the largest number of tournaments return between November 2020 and the end of March 2021 are:

  • Texas (54 tournaments)
  • Wisconsin (22 tournaments)
  • Florida (21 tournaments)
  • West Virginia (13 tournaments)
  • Maryland (9 tournaments)
  • Indiana (7 tournaments)
  • Mississippi (7 tournaments)

Some tournaments are choosing to relocate to other states to enable travel teams to compete still. For example, in Boston, Massachusetts, some events are being moved to Connecticut and New Hampshire, causing potential Boston hotel revenue losses of over $574,848. The data also shows that most of the teams are currently traveling to tournaments from New York, NY; Los Angeles, CA; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; Las Vegas, NV; and San Diego, CA.

Due to tighter restrictions on indoor tournaments, when it comes to travel tournament cancellations, some sports like hockey have been hit harder than others that are commonly played outdoors, such as soccer and baseball. EventConnect’s data shows that while there were 140 hockey tournaments initially scheduled for 2020, only 10 of them could be played.

“This year has been filled with uncertainty in the youth and amateur sports industry, but it is encouraging to see that sporting events are starting to kick off again, especially around the South and East Coast. I hope they will soon pick up again on the West Coast as well in a manner that ensures everyone’s health and safety,” said John D’Orsay, CEO at EventConnect. “In areas where youth and amateur sports have not yet come back, there is an opportunity for tournament rights holders to use this time to review their workflow and the technology that they use to manage events. Our highly customizable solution gives tournament organizers more time to market and produces events with a lower headcount, ultimately resulting in increased revenue.”

About the data

The report’s findings were compiled from an internal database of over 4,000 events, 400 associations, 15,000 hotels, and 800 cities. The loss of city revenue was calculated using EventConnect’s data on the average cost of a hotel room for a team at a travel tournament and the assumption that a family spends $115 per day traveling on food, drinks, transportation and entertainment.

Find the full report here: https://eventconnect.io/youth-amateur-sports-return/

About EventConnect

EventConnect is the only event management software in the sports tourism industry that connects thousands of partners on one platform. Working with more than 4,000 events, 15,000 hotels in over 800 cities across North America, we have built a platform that truly makes everyone’s experience better. EventConnect helps sports organizations reduce time spent on administrative tasks and increase capacity for delivering memorable experiences to all participants. The end-to-end platform is customized for each partner’s needs and is seamless for organizers and participants to use, ensuring that it creates efficiency while increasing value. EventConnect has an average savings of 24% on hotel rates versus the leading booking platforms and has a 98% rate of booking satisfaction and positive experiences.

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We Can Save You Money In 2021 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

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www.sadlersports.com/soda

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“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

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Since 1981”

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Comeback Kids – Youth Sports Programming Amidst a Pandemic !

Courtesy Recreation Management Magazine –

       By Rick Dandes

PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY

After months of shutdown because of the coronavirus, there is cautious optimism among those who fund, manage and run youth sports programs that leagues can resume and kids can play safely.

“Organized sports are starting to return for youth of all ages, though as of September, they are still half as active as they were prior to the pandemic,” said Jon Solomon, editorial director, Aspen Institute Sports & Society Program. “Parents are more willing to let their children play, and to spend money to support those activities, despite increasing concerns about the risks of COVID-19 transmission as well as transportation and scheduling concerns with school starting up again.”

Meanwhile, Solomon noted, a growing number of youths have no interest in returning to the primary sport they played pre-pandemic—nearly three in 10 now, according to a national survey of parents conducted by the Aspen Institute.

A year ago, Aspen’s Project Play program provided insights on how common it is for kids to quit sports, while sharing resources to keep them playing. But no one could have envisioned that every child would be “retired” by March 2020, Solomon said.

“Prior to the COVID-19 shutdown, four out of 10 youth sports families saw their child play their primary sport at least four days per week,” he explained, “so the change was a jolt for many families. By September 2020, many parts of the country were back to playing sports, but which sports returned still varied by state and local communities.”

Solomon revealed other notable takeaways from the survey: One of the most popular activities for youth was bicycling, he said. While kids have significantly decreased their hours in most sports and activities during the pandemic, bicycling stayed about the same (9.1 hours per week during COVID-19, compared with 10.5 hours per week before COVID-19). Bicycling went from the 16th-most popular activity pre-pandemic to No. 3 in hours spent during COVID-19, behind only tackle and flag football.

Of the 21 sports and activities tracked by the Aspen Institute survey, parents reported increased hours by their child in 10 of them between June 2020 and September 2020. Some of the changes in time spent could be due to the sports calendar evolving to different seasons.

“Kids spent 29% more time on baseball in September than in June,” Solomon noted. “Soccer moved slower with a 4% increase over those three months. Tackle football was up 10%. Basketball, a contact sport often played indoors during the winter, was down 10%. The average child spends about 6.5 hours less per week on sports during COVID-19. Free play, practices and competitions have all significantly declined. Time spent on games has declined by 59%, and practice hours are down 54% during the pandemic, though both saw increases in September 2020 compared to June 2020.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF YOUTH SPORTS FOUNDATION

“The pandemic has had a major effect on all of our activities at the YMCA, especially programming,” said Bonita McDowell, CEO of the Greater Susquehanna Valley YMCA.

“One example of that was how the shutdown affected our swim team, which is comprised of really talented youth-age swimmers. They had national swim meets right around the corner, and then it was canceled.”

What was sad, McDowell explained, is that these youths often get scholarships at Division 1 universities through their performances at the nationals. “They were not able to finish out their senior season with YMCA Swimming. It was really unfortunate for them to miss out on that. Nationals is what they swim for all year as they grow up—looking for the chance to compete at that level of competition.”

It was a shame to see track and field, baseball, and softball seasons canceled at the high school level as well, McDowell said. With those sports opportunities not there, the YMCA began thinking about what kids could do during that free time. “Our solution was to do a lot of virtual coaching—offering ideas on ways for kids to be active on their own, wherever they are. We thought about coaching them on training that they can do alone, workouts they can do on their own. For swimmers, the challenge was, what kind of training can they do outside the pool? So there was still a lot of coaching going on, mostly for our older kids. The younger kids, we did what we could.”

Hard Hit

The Youth Sports Foundation in Muscatine, Iowa, is a private, nonprofit organization running youth sports in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Eastern Nebraska. When the pandemic first hit, said president and co-founder Jim Miller, “our co-ed track-and-field program, which is in the spring, got shut down. In February we tried to be optimistic. Even in March. We kept moving the programs scheduled for spring back a month, then another month, until it got to the point where we realized we were not going to be able to have the programs up and running. All spring and summer programs had to be canceled. We had to give refunds because typically we do our registration in February for spring programs. That money had to go back to parents, and when you are nonprofit you rely on those registration fees and donations.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY

The other problem that Miller had involved grants. “When I go out to get funding for the new year, we usually start in December and January. By February, we had already gotten some grants. When the pandemic hit, the people who handed out the grants called and said they were going to take those funds and redirect it to the COVID fight. As an American, how can I argue with what could help, considering what was going on in March? That really hurt us as well. Grant funding, and no programs. I didn’t know where we were going to be.”

As states shut down, the foundation got enormous numbers of requests for refunds from parents and from some of the leagues. “It’s amazing how in our region, the decisions made by colleges to play or not to play affects parents in youth programs,” Miller said.” When the Big 10 shut down and originally said they were not going to play football, the number of phone calls we got asking for refunds was significant. This was a very difficult time for us. Things have gotten better for us in the fall.”

Up & Running, Carefully

The youth sports landscape has become clogged with challenges, as recreation professionals continue to revamp and rethink their youth programming during these unprecedented times, said John Engh, executive director, National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS).

In many states, Engh said, “outdoor youth sports programs like baseball, softball and soccer are up and running in a variety of forms, ranging from strictly skill-based practice sessions providing young athletes with the chance to at least be back on the field, to the actual playing of games and, in some cases, even tournaments—all with social distancing guidelines and assorted safety protocols in place.”

At NAYS, where the focus is on out-of-school recreational youth sports programs, “We encouraged youth sports administrators to use the most up-to-date information to set safety standards,” Engh said. “Additionally, we encourage those youth sports leaders to serve as a conduit to ensure the volunteer youth sports organizations get the information.”

Miller wishes he had some of that information back last spring. “We did not do anything virtually,” he said. “I wasn’t sure what I could do virtually with our track program in the summer or for our running summer sports camps. Our staff did talk about virtual programming.”

Miller contracts out YSF tech work, but that will change, he said. “Going forward, our board of directors has realized that it is essential. We need to use technology. Our coaches and board meetings were accessible on the Zoom platform, but as far as programming goes, at the time when the pandemic first hit, we just weren’t set up for that. We are looking into that now. We are looking to work with colleges on creating programs.”

Miller did get kids to register for fall football, volleyball and cheerleading programs, and those are going along “pretty good,” he said. “The football programs are operating with COVID guidelines that are in place. We had some cheerleading. But our volleyball got canceled altogether. We are only at about a third of where we were last year when it comes to our fall activities.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY

Meanwhile, all summer Miller and his staff worked with health officials on COVID guidelines—a difficult task, he explained, “because we use schools for our game sites and they all had different guidelines, so we were having to deal with that by individual district. Municipalities also had mandates and recommendations. It was a challenge, but we are playing some football, girls are cheerleading, and that was better than not having anything at all.”

Miller is optimistic about Spring and Summer 2021 youth leagues. “We are planning for things to be normal,” he said. “We hope there will be a vaccine available in 2021. I know there will continue to be guidelines that we’ll have to follow. But I told my staff to plan for a season like we normally do, and we’ll adjust on the fly as needed.”

Going through the pandemic last spring and summer taught the staff at YSF some things so they feel more prepared to adjust if they can’t have a normal year.

“Here in Iowa,” Miller said, “high school football has proceeded as normal, and that has been great. This past summer we ran a lot of youth baseball and softball and we have not seen COVID cases. In our fall Danville, Iowa, football program, however, I had to shut it down because we had five kids testing positive for COVID. We took it down for 10 days before re-evaluating the program.”

Miller is taking things as they come, something all youth programs, no matter where they are, will have to do, he said. “Here we have guidelines, and we’ll shut a program down if we need to and add extra weeks to the season for that team. We are doing what we need to do to keep kids safe. I think we’ll be OK for spring and summer. I hope our donations come back because if they don’t, that will kill us. We had to lay off three staffers. It’s still a fluid situation.”

Coaches, players and parents have all been great knowing that from this week to next week it could all change in an instant, Miller said. “Everyone is flexible. We have had a six-week football season, but it could be longer if needed. Right now things are good and we are being positive.”

MA. State releases updated COVID-19 safety guidelines for youth, adult amateur sports !

State releases updated COVID-19 safety guidelines for youth, adult amateur sports
Dedham warns youth sports are contributing to COVID-19 spread

Potential COVID-19 exposure at sports complex and church in Oneida County, NY !

ONEIDA COUNTY, N.Y. — The Oneida County Health Department is alerting residents to two potential public exposures to COVID-19.

Accelerate Sports

  • Located at 5241 Judd Road in Whitesboro
  • Monday, Nov. 2: 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Rome Christian Center

  • Located at 7985 Turin Road in Rome
  • Sunday, Nov. 8: 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. and 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m.

Anyone who may have been exposed should monitor their health for symptoms of COVID-19. Symptoms include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

If symptoms occur, stay home and contact your primary care provider for further guidance.


Despite COVID, Steen Sports Park says 2020 was a success !

Klamath Falls, OR  – Executive Director Scott White reported Wednesday that despite the cancellations forced by COVID-19, Steen Sports Park still brought a $3.47 million indirect economic impact for the local economy.

White noted that 193 teams participated in youth baseball and softball tournaments at the park, with 185 of those teams coming from out of the region.

“Most of the teams were out of the Central Valley and Bay Areas of California,” said White. “However, we saw teams from all over Oregon, Washington and Nevada also.”

While in town, teams spent approximately $2 million on hotels, food and fuel. White noted that park staff and volunteers were routinely asked what visitors could do while not at the park. “I pointed them to Crater Lake, the Lava Beds, the bowling alley, and the putt putt course at Running Y,” said White.

“We have no way of calculating those recreational metrics outside of the park at this time, but I am confident the economic impact is even greater than we can report due to those other activities.”

“Like all other business, we were worried when COVID threw a grenade on our 2020 plans and we weren’t sure how we were going to get through our primary revenue season,” said park president Mike Reeder.

The park made significant changes to make sure tournaments were safe for participants and fans.

“We hung countless social distancing signs, we required masks indoors and only allowed two people in the restrooms at all times. We were disinfecting regularly and only sold prepackaged goods for concessions,” said Reeder. “For the most part, I think our visitors understood and complied with the guidelines pretty well. I am happy that I have not heard of one reported case resulting from our tournaments.”

In additions, the park was awarded a $25,000 Klamath County Tourism Grant aimed at improving infrastructure.

“We have learned that there is an immediate need to revamp our web presence so a portion of this award will be going to upgrade and maintain our website,” noted Reeder. The funds will also be used for maintenance upgrades.

In the coming weeks, the park will announce its 2021 tournament schedule.

“We’ve already locked in seven fastpitch softball tournaments and we are working to match that with both baseball and adult softball,” said White. “We are very excited for what 2021 will bring for our local teams, our community, and the great partnerships we’ve built with teams across the west.”

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 – 21 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

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“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

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** “STAY SMART ** STAY SAFE” ** STAY HEALTHY **

Pitching Rubbers: It’s Hip To Be Square !

Being off just a little really means a lot

In my travels around the U.S. over the years I’ve seen a lot of softball and baseball fields. There is one thing that has always irked me: the astonishing number of fields I’ve seen where the pitching rubber is not square to home plate. Sometimes, it’s not even CLOSE! I’m talking about fields at all levels, from the MLB all the way down to the youth leagues. Main mounds and bullpens alike are affected here.

The Impact on Pitchers

While many people think having your pitching rubber “close to square” is close enough, please consider this…

If your pitching rubber is twisted off square by a mere ¼” on an adult baseball field (60′ 6″ pitching distance), the centerline at home plate will jump off by 14 ½” to the left or right, depending which way the rubber is twisted. Increase the skew in the rubber to ½” off square and you move that center line off of the center of home plate by an astounding 2′ 6 ¼”!

An misaligned rubber will affect a pitcher’s pitching mechanics. Ask any pitching coach or trainer. How can the pitcher square to the plate in his wind up when the front edge of the pitching rubber is not even square to the plate? Because of that, they must adjust, and this is where bad habits begin. As they adjust their mechanics, it can increase wear on a pitchers arm or other parts of the body as they work to compensate for the misalignment.

pitching rubber alignment

How to Square Your Pitching Rubber

The apex of the home plate is the benchmark of a ball field. The centerline of the field runs from that point through the center of the pitching rubber to the center of second base. The front edge of the pitching rubber should be exactly perpendicular to that centerline. Follow these simple steps to make sure you start squaring your pitching rubber off right.

    1. On your pitching rubber, measure and scribe with a pencil a centerline down the center of the pitching rubber.
    2. Set up a string line that runs from the apex of the home plate to the center of second base.
    3. Make sure it is extra tight so there is little chance for side-to-side movement.
    4. Pop the string line over the top of your pitching rubber several times to figure out the average spot it lands on the plate.
    5. Check to make sure the string line is landing over the center line scribed on the rubber. If not, you need to adjust the rubber side-to-side in order to get it in the right location.
    6. Next, measure from the apex of home plate to the front center edge of the pitching rubber. Once you’ve measured out the proper pitching distance, then measure out 8 ½” from the centerline on either side of the pitching rubber and make a mark.

pitching rubber measurements

  1. Now measure from the front of the rubber at those marks, to the respective front corners of the home plate, as it shows in the table and drawing above. If the pitching distance and the squaring distance equal what is suggested on the chart, then your pitching rubber should be square to the plate.
  2. Remember, when setting your pitching rubber, there are 4 parameters to repeatedly check as you are setting a pitching rubber. Square to the plate is just one of them. You must also check and recheck your distances, the levelness of the rubber and it’s elevation several times during the placement of the rubber.

For expanded directions on setting a pitching rubber, consult Beacon’s Ballfield Dimensions and Resource Guide online version or you can order a print version of the Ballfield Dimensions Guide if you don’t already have one.

Take it from Huey Lewis and the News:

But don’t you try to fight it, an idea whose time has come;
Don’t tell me that I’m crazy;
Don’t tell me I’m nowhere;
Take it from me;
It’s hip to be square!

The pitchers and catchers who use your fields will thank you…because it’s hip to be square.

Paul Zwaska

Paul Zwaska

A former head groundskeeper for the Baltimore Orioles, Paul has been with Beacon Athletics for two decades. Among his many accomplishments, he authored Groundskeeper University, the first online ballfield maintenance training venue and continues to find innovative ways to help groundskeepers.

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 – 21 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

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[[ Available In SODA Store Online !]]

** “STAY SMART ** STAY SAFE” ** STAY HEALTHY **

‘Fallbrook/Ingold, CA. Sports Park facing huge deficits….’

11/4/2020 

Riverside, CA –

It is an absolute disgrace that San Diego County is not supporting the Ingold Sports Park. This facility was started by local heroes and friends of Fallbrook, and cost over $4 million to begin operations in May 2000.

Through a tremendous amount of hard work, their dream became a reality. Ingold Sports Park has been serving a large part of North County ever since – not for profit – but for the betterment of the community. Today it serves over 3,500 people a week.

The county cannot put overly restrictive conditions on the park, or any business, without helping them offset those losses. Where is their share of the $2 trillion the federal government promised? The loss of this park will be devastating to the Fallbrook/Bonsall area and the county is hiding.

Please call or write the county supervisor today – before it’s too late –

Jim Desmond, District 5, 1600 Pacific Highway, Room 335, San Diego, CA 92101, 619-531-5555 or jim.desmond@sdcounty.ca.gov.

Bob Tavano

Former park volunteer

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

We Can Save You Money In 2020 – 21 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[[ Available In SODA Store Online !]]

** “STAY SMART ** STAY SAFE” ** STAY HEALTHY **