The SODA Blog

The official blog of the Sportsplex Operators & Developers Association

Local sports complex receives positive feedback after grand opening. !

SAN ANGELO, TX – The Sports Next Level complex has officially opened in San Angelo under Governor Greg Abbott’s executive order. The facility has many plans in mind moving forward.

“People were itching to get out and I think we’ve created something that’s family oriented and something for everybody to do,” Sports Next Level general manager Ronnie Gaines said. “From the kids all the way up to grandparents and parents, relatives, it’s a one stop shop for people to come and have a good time. So far we’ve gotten a real good reaction from people coming in and seeing what we have to offer.”

Although friends and family members can compete in several activities, Gaines says overall safety measures are a top priority.

“We’re having people wear gloves and distance themselves,” Gaines said. “It’s been tough, but people are itching to get in and we’ve had them in and it’s been good so far.”

While some sporting activities have already launched, Gaines says there’s many more to come.

“We’re doing a little bit of everything,” Gaines said. “Obviously we have the cages and the training center where we have our trainers. We train kids and have cage rentals, we have the corn hole and washer pits and we have the restaurant, the sport simulator and the putt putt. We’re just planning on to keep rolling and have camps, clinics, tournaments and closest to the pin challenges on the golf range.”

The facility entered week two since their grand opening. there were plans of an earlier date, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the facility executed plan B.

“We planned to do it a lot earlier but I believe it was a blessing in disguise with us waiting to hear from the governor on the 18th and stuff like that,” Gaines said. “We got pushed back, but we got to work out the kinks and we kind of had a soft opening and had to work all the learning curves out before we started.”

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

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“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

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** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

Five Restroom Upgrades to Improve Hand Washing and Minimize Germs !

Five Restroom Upgrades to Improve Hand Washing and Minimize Germs !

Menomonee Falls, WI (May 27, 2020) – The rapid spread of COVID-19 has made an unprecedented and indelible mark on how our society responds to potential germ exposure, raising new questions around the hygienic and safe usage of public restrooms.

In a matter of weeks, the pandemic caused a major uptick in hand washing, taught us the virtues of social distancing and elevated our awareness of hand-to-surface contact.

“As businesses and public establishments reopen and Americans return to using facilities, all eyes are on public restrooms,” says Jon Dommisse, director of strategy and corporate development, Bradley Corp., a global manufacturer of restroom equipment. “Today’s commercial washroom will be of paramount importance in providing hand washing systems and supplies, and mitigating sickness-causing germs.”

Dommisse offers several considerations for keeping restrooms clean, maintained, well-equipped and prepared for a healthy hand washing experience:

  1. Post signage. Reinforce cleanliness with friendly reminders about washing hands for 20 seconds per Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines, maintaining safe distances between users, throwing away paper towels, etc. The Healthy Hand Washing Survey by Bradley Corp. shows that 40% of Americans increase hand washing when signs are posted.

“Posting updated cleaning schedules in restrooms also goes a long way in helping to reassure customers the facility is taking steps to ensure a clean environment and cares about keeping them safe,” Dommisse said.

  1. Offer touchless fixtures. Cross contamination of germs in restrooms can be reduced by using touch-free fixtures for everything from soap, faucets, hand dryers/towels, doors and flushers. Public health experts agree: “Under any circumstance, using touchless fixtures helps to inhibit the spread of germs in restrooms and buildings,” says medical microbiologist Michael P. McCann, Ph.D., professor of biology, Saint Joseph’s University. “The more we avoid restroom touchpoints, the healthier and easier our operations will be. Hands-free washrooms are a win-win for consumers and businesses.”

Research shows that consumers are highly in favor of using touch-free fixtures. “91% of Americans believe it’s extremely or somewhat important that public restrooms are equipped with touchless fixtures,” Dommisse said. “In fact, making everything touchless is Americans’ most requested improvement in restrooms.”

  1. Increase cleaning, sanitization and restocking. Proper and frequent cleaning and disinfection is key for restrooms, especially for high-touch surfaces, such as doorknobs, faucets, sinks, toilets, stall door openers and paper towel dispensers. According to the CDC, daily cleaning with soap and water reduces germs, dirt, and impurities on the surface, and should be done frequently, especially if there is high traffic.

“It’s also important to disinfect surfaces to kill germs at least once daily, and more often if the restroom is busy,” Dr. McCann said. Finally, be sure to check and restock supplies regularly. Experiencing unclean low-stocked restrooms are pet peeves for restroom users.

  1. Provide trash cans and hand sanitizer near exits. “Our research shows that 65% of Americans use paper toweling to avoid contact with restroom doors and faucets,” Dommisse said. “Keeping paper towels and waste containers near doorways can be helpful so people can throw them away upon exiting.”

Installing hand sanitizers outside restrooms is another way people can sanitize their hands upon entering and leaving the restroom.

 

  1. Prop open doors to increase visibility and minimize contact. To limit the number of people in restrooms and encourage social distancing, a propped open door can give people a small window into seeing how many others are already inside. In addition, a slightly opened door allows people to maneuver the door with their elbow, as opposed to their hands.

Bradley is a leading manufacturer of commercial plumbing fixtures, washroom accessories, restroom partitions, emergency fixtures and solid plastic lockers. For more information, visit www.bradleycorp.com/handwashing.

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For almost 100 years, Bradley has created the most complete and advanced commercial washrooms and comprehensive solutions that make industrial environments safe. Bradley is the industry’s leading source for multi-function hand washing and drying fixtures, accessories, partitions, solid plastic lockers, as well as emergency safety fixtures and electric tankless heaters for industrial applications. Headquartered in Menomonee Falls, Wis., USA, Bradley serves commercial, institutional and industrial building markets worldwide. For more information visit https://www.bradleycorp.com.

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

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“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

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** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

Panama City Beach Sports Complex prepares for the summer. !

PANAMA CITY BEACH, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) The Panama City Beach Sports Complex is getting ready for a summer filled with sports, and it all kicks off Tuesday with a trial run with a group called Prep Baseball Report who will be running a high school showcase with some new tools and equipment.

The Panama City Beach Sports Complex is getting ready to welcome visitors back after being closed for two months. (WJHG/WECP)

“We’re going to welcome people with open arms. Obviously not truly hugging them, but keeping our distance, and we are going to remind people to remain in groups of ten or less and remain six to eight feet from other groups of ten or less,” said Panama City Beach Sports Complex General Manager, Jamie Cox.

The bleachers will be marked off for the showcase, but this weekend, they will be having dual events of USFA softball and Perfect Game Baseball, each using five of the diamond fields. The cleaning crew at the complex has been given strict instructions to continuously wipe off bleachers, chairs, and other frequently touched surfaces. dugouts will be thoroughly cleaned between games along with railings that players tend to lean on during games.

“We are excited that the day has finally come where we can implement these new policies and guidelines, which is what they are. People are coming out here. They need to be respectful of others and understand that people still want to remain a safe distance,” said Cox.

Cox also emphasized just how important a role vacation rentals made in the reopening of the complex.

“We knew that we were the next step to go, so we were very excited. We are glad that youth sports are back up. I know a lot of kids and a lot of families are ready to get back on the ball field,” said Cox.

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

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** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

Hutch Rec announces updated tournament schedule for Fun Valley Sports Complex. !

Hutchinson, KS. – Fun Valley Sports Complex has 17 fastpitch softball and baseball tournaments scheduled this summer at the facility for youth divisions ranging from 8U through 18U. Hutch Rec is partnering with Hap Dumont and USSSA affiliations for baseball, and the Independent Fastpitch Association (IFA) and USSSA for fastpitch.

Hutch Rec staff recently confirmed its newest tournament schedule for the summer that now includes 10 fastpitch tournaments and seven baseball tournaments that will be held at both Fun Valley and Hobart-Detter Field.

Staff at both facilities will be practicing the Reopening Guidelines set forth by the Kansas Recreation and Parks Association and adopted by the governor’s office on May 21. These guidelines can be viewed at krpa.org/covid19 and on the COVID-19 section on hutchrec.com.

The 2020 tournament schedule includes:

‒ May 31: IFA Valley Opener – Fastpitch (8U-14U)

‒ June 4-7: USSSA Next Level Showcase Tournament – Baseball (14U-18U)

‒ June 13-14: Hap Dumont Battle for the Belts – Baseball (8U-14U)

‒ June 20-21: IFA Father’s Day Bash – Fastpitch (8U-14U)

‒ June 26-28: Kansas Wood Bat Championship – Baseball (14U-18U)

‒ June 27-28: IFA Salina/Fun Valley Summer Slugfest – Fastpitch (8U-18U)

‒ July 3-5: USSSA Stars & Stripes – Baseball (8U-18U)

‒ July 3-5: USSSA Stars & Stripes – Fastpitch (8U-18U)

‒ July 9-12: Hap Dumont 13U State – Baseball (13U)

‒ July 11-12: IFA State Tournament – Fastpitch (14U-18U)

‒ July 18-19: USSSA Paint the Valley Pink – Fastpitch (8U-18U)

‒ July 25-26: IFA Invitational – Fastpitch (8U-18U)

‒ August 1-2: USSSA Battle for the Rings – Fastpitch (8U-18U)

‒ August 8-9: USSSA Battle for the Rings – Baseball (8U-18U)

‒ August 15-16: Hap Dumont Salt City Classic – Baseball (8U-14U)

‒ August 22-23: IFA Salt City Classic – Fastpitch (8U-14U)

‒ August 29-30: USSSA Salt City Invitational – Fastpitch (8U-14U)

For more information about specific COVID-19 guidelines and procedures being followed, visit the COVID-19 section at hutchrec.com. Updated information will be shared through Hutch Rec’s social media pages, website and through media outlets.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

N.H. Task force approves reopening guidelines for camps, youth sports !

The task force making recommendations for reopening sectors of the New Hampshire economy unanimously approved guidelines Tuesday for summer camps, museums and, after some debate, youth sports.

The group heard a lengthy presentation Monday about how to safely reopen youth and amateur sports in New Hampshire in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Phase 1 would allow for small group workouts of 10 people or less with distancing guidelines that officials said would allow athletes to practice skills and get back in shape.

Phase 2 would increase the group size to 50 to allow scrimmages and games, but one task force member had concerns because children are involved.

“There’s risk involved in any of this reopening, and we, as a task force, weigh these issues very, very carefully,” said state Sen. Shannon Chandley. “I know public health later weighs in very carefully and, certainly, the governor.”

The task force agreed to send a letter to public health officials asking them to carefully vet the proposal, acknowledging that while the guidelines will apply to all sports, some low-contact sports, such as baseball and softball, might have an easier time following the proposed rules.

There were also questions Tuesday about lodging and concerns about handling visitors from other states. The task force is going to ask Maine and Vermont officials about what they’re doing.

“Nothing that other states are doing is binding, but in some cases, it can help inform public health and the governor,” said D.J. Bettencourt, the governor’s policy director.

The task force was expected to vote on guidelines for adult day care, but that was removed from consideration so more work could be done on the proposal.

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

COVID-19 Developments – Articles from around the web !

THE ULTIMATE BALLFIELD RESOURCE | BEACON ATHLETICS


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While we navigate our way through the current public health crisis, we are keeping one eye on developments from around the country. Relevant stories related to COVID-19 are posted here. You can count on this being your go-to resource to stay up to date.For information related directly to where each state’s current policy with reopening, reference this resource: CNN.com – Where all 50 states stand on reopeningTo review the most recent statements from the various league governing bodies: Latest Leagues Updates

FIND YOUR STATE POLICY FOR REOPENING IF LOCKED DOWN…

LATEST STORIES from Around the Web

Bare Necessities: How to Preserve Your Field !

This is your guide to lockdown field maintenance.

As the country slowly begins to move toward reopening from the Covid-19 shutdown, those on the front lines of youth sports — specifically baseball and softball — are stuck in a wait-and-see mode. Left to the mercy of governors in each state, those of us involved understand that youth sports are not considered essential like other parts of the economy. Some states, such as Illinois, have already called off all youth sports for the summer and the governor is now contemplating the fate of fall sports there. No doubt, there will be other states and individual leagues that won’t see any action this summer.

But even if the sport is shutdown, fields will still need to be managed as they are living biosystems that will need attention. So what basic maintenance do you really need to be perform? How will these practices help to maintain or even improve the playing field for next spring season or fall ball ?

MOWING: This is pretty obvious but let’s dig in a little deeper. Whether your field is irrigated or not, raise the mowing height. Raise it more for unirrigated fields than irrigated. This will push the plant to lengthen its roots in the soil making it more drought tolerant going into the hot and dry summer months. Mow according to growth rate so that you are mowing off no more than 1/3 of the leaf blade off the plant.

IRRIGATION: If your field is outfitted with irrigation — be it manual or automatic — use it! Nothing helps thicken your turf more than water and a lack of play. No capitol project pays more dividends to your field than having an irrigation system installed. Not only will it help your turf, but when play does resume, it will also greatly improve the condition of your infield skin as well.

VIEW PRODUCTS

FERTILIZATION: If your organization can afford it in the current situation, maintain fertility on your field to encourage thick, healthy turf. This is an extremely rare opportunity (hopefully) to have a growing season without play. You can really improve the quality of the turf areas on your ball diamond. With limited staff for mowing, use slow release fertilizers and only apply one half to ¾ of a pound of nitrogen per 1000/sq ft. Enough fertilizer to keep the grass healthy and spreading, but not too much to push a ton of top growth requiring more frequent mowing.

VIEW PRODUCTS

INFIELD SKIN: Keep it weed free by dragging twice a week and keep them tight to prevent any soil migration from heavy rains. Fix any lips that impede the flow of water off the infield skin. Level any low areas that are holding water. Clean up the turf edges by running an edger along them as your grass growth dictates. All of this improves infield drainage and plays into how quickly the field will be ready to play on after a rain event.

VIEW PRODUCTS

WARNING TRACK: Same as infield skins mentioned above, drag periodically to manage weeds. Edge the turf edge if you have the time and manpower to do so.

VIEW LESSON

MOUND & PLATE: Keep them tarped to preserve moisture in these areas. Use of tarps will also prevent the pitching mound from eroding into the infield grass from rainfall or irrigation.

VIEW PRODUCTS

CREW SAFETY: Finally, make sure you are protecting yourself and your crew or volunteers. These are ways to help ensure a safe environment for everyone:

  • Adhere to strict guidelines that make sure staff who are feeling sick do not come to work.
  • Wear masks and gloves.
  • Sanitize equipment before and after use.
  • Minimize face-to-face meetings in smaller areas.
  • Have sanitizing wipes available in many areas at your facility.
  • Schedule staff to work in shifts for easier social distancing while working on fields.
  • Minimize projects that require staff to be in close proximity.

Make the most of things.

Take this rare opportunity to give your field, especially your turfgrass, what it needs to become better and stronger so your field will be in tip-top shape when games resume. These field preservation tips will help whether you can finally get back on them in the next several weeks, months or next spring.

Your field will thank you.

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

Sports Organizations and Coronavirus (COVID-19): Cancel or Mitigate the Risks ?

Coronavirus protocol in sports organizations

Updated 4/22/2020

Applying Risk Management to Address Coronavirus Risk

The coronavirus threat and the ultimate impact on society and the sports community is unknown at this time. The situation is fluid with new information being released almost hourly regarding the progression of the COVID-19 outbreak and what steps various sports organizations are taking to address the situation. The trends have swung from mitigation to cancellation and now back to mitigation again with the planned reopening of various states. Any significant threat such as COVID-19 should be treated with the application of the risk management process.

There is safety in following the lead of authority sources

In order to prove negligence in failure to cancel or mitigate risks, courts will look to authority sources to determine the standard of care that is owed to sports organization staff, participants, and spectators. Therefore, sports organizations should pay close attention to the mandatory governmental regulations and/or recommended guidelines published by the various authority sources:

  • Federal/State/Local government: Constantly monitor governmental health agencies such as U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), your state’s public health department, and other county/local authorities.
  • School Districts: School districts provide localized advice based on the levels of coronavirus risk in a particular community. However, the risk components of school sports may be different than those posed by local, community-based sports organizations.
  • Sports Governing Bodies: Monitor the website, emails, and social media from the sports governing bodies that oversee your sport. Examples of sports governing bodies include USOCNCAANFHS, and USA Baseball.

Potential liability exposure exists for sports organizations

Below are the most common legal theories of recovery for a claimant who has been allegedly exposed to coronavirus with resulting sickness or death:

  1. Negligent failure to cancel event resulting in COVID-19 transmission.
  2. Negligent failure to take mitigation steps if events are not cancelled resulting in COVID-19 transmission.

It’s one thing to allege negligence, but it must be proved by showing:

  1. Duty owed to the claimant (may be different for participants vs spectators)
  2. Breach of duty by not following mandatory regulations and/or guidelines on cancellation or mitigation from sources as CDC, state health departments, and county/local authorities.
  3. Breach of duty was the proximate cause of the sickness. Proving causation may be a tall order according to law professor Benjamin Zipurski of Fordham University. Zipurski states that a claimant would need to prove they did not have a virus before the event, they did not come in contact with anyone or any shared spaces on the way to the event, and they did not come in contact with anyone or any shared spaces after the event. This is further complicated by the long incubation period of COVID-19 which may be up to two weeks.  On the other hand, it may be possible to trace the transmission of  COVID-19 if multiple people who attended the same event become infected.
  4. Damages (medical bills, loss of income, loss of companionship, disability, pain and suffering, etc.)

And then there are legal defenses to negligence such as the assumption of a known risk. And who in society has not been warned of the Coronavirus transmission risk by the media?

Does General Liability insurance provide coverage for sports organizations that are sued for failure to cancel or mitigate risk?

General Liability policies may provide coverage, but it depends on whether an infection event is considered to be an occurrence and the existence of certain policy exclusions. An exclusion means that a particular type or cause of injury is not covered. General Liability policies cover certain lawsuits alleging bodily injury or property damage caused by an occurrence and personal/advertising injury, subject to standard exclusions (built into the policy form) and non-standard exclusions (added by endorsement).

In the context of coronavirus, it is clear that disease falls under the definition of “bodily injury”. However, if coronavirus becomes widespread, there is an argument that infection does not fall under the policy requirement of an “occurrence.” Some authorities argue that an occurrence must be an accident or unexpected. This will undoubtedly be tested in the courts.

Below are some possible non-standard policy exclusions that could result in a coronavirus claim denial:

  • Communicable Disease Exclusion: In my experience, most sports organization General Liability policies don’t include this exclusion. However, it is seen on some sports facility General Liability policies such as fitness centers and martial arts studios.
  • Pandemic/Virus/Bacterial/Fungus Exclusion
  • Pollution Exclusions: Some absolute pollution exclusions may be worded broadly enough to define a pollutant as a bacteria or virus.

Different levels of transmission risk factors for different sports organizations

The following factors should be considered when a sports organization makes decisions regarding cancellation or how to best mitigate coronavirus risks. Know the risk factors for your particular sports organization and tailor a plan to fit your specific needs. For example, the transmission risks of many local sports organizations may be lower than that of high school, college, or professional sports teams.

  • What is happening in your specific community. If coronavirus is present or widespread in your community, you should increase your level of aggressiveness in applying risk management.
  • Analyze separately the risks from the perspective of staff, participants, spectators, and third-party vendors. Mitigation plans may need to be customized for each group.
  • According to the CDC, the risks to older adults and those with serious chronic medical conditions are elevated. According to U.S News & World Report, children and teens are at a lower risk and typically have milder symptoms or none at all and the death rate is much lower than middle aged and older populations. Exposure transmission to seniors may occur in their role as sports participants, coaches, spectators, or parent/guardians. Mitigation plans should be adopted to protect those with the highest level of risk.
  • Playing locally vs travel: Local play entails less transmission risk than air, bus, or train travel. Staff and participant travel to out-of-town conferences or competitions is a higher risk activity.
  • Spectators: Higher spectator transmission rates can be expected when spectators are indoors, confined in a small enclosed space, seniors, or have compromised immune systems.
  • Crowd size: The larger the crowd size, the greater the transmission risk. Currently many authority sorces are recommending that crowd sizes be limited to 10 or fewer.

How to mitigate liability risk by common sense risk management practices

  • Risk Warning: Sports programs should disseminate information to all staff, coaches, players, parents, and spectators about the coronavirus risk and practices that should be undertaken to mitigate risks. Information should be disseminated by way of email, social media, coach talks, and public announcements.
  • Social Distancing: All players, coaches, staff, independent contractors and spectators should practice social distancing of 6 ft. wherever possible, especially in common areas. Of course, this won’t always apply to players while engaging in the sports activity.
  • Temperature Check: Players and spectators should be asked to take their own temperature before leaving the house and they should stay at home with any reading of 100.4 Fahrenheit  or higher according to CDC definitions of reportable illnesses for contagious disease. The sports organization can assign a staff member to use an infrared non-contact forehead thermometer to take the temperature of all players and spectators before they enter the field/facility. Any reading of 100.4 or higher should result in a denial of entry. These thermometers are now commonly available for under $100.
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): All coaches, staff, and independent contractors should wear PPE such as face-masks and gloves whenever applicable. Players should wear face-masks in close contact areas and situations where applicable.
  • Spacing Of Player Equipment: Player equipment should be spaced accordingly to prevent close contact.
  • Limit Team Shared Equipment: The use of team shared equipment should be limited whenever possible and should be sanitized after each use.
  • Rest Rooms: Rest rooms should limit occupancy to one person at a time.
  • Spread Out Scheduling Of Practice And Games: There should be enough time between practices and games to allow one group to vacate the premises before the next group enters.
  • Hygiene/Hand Washing/Touching Face/Laundering: Players and coaches should practice proper hygiene, wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, use alcohol-based hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol), abstain from touching their face (mouth, eyes, or nose), and cover their cough or sneeze with a tissue and throw tissue in the trash. Facilities and sports organizations should provide hand washing and hand sanitizer stations and should schedule mandatory use at breaks. Carry small bottles of alcohol-based disinfectant when hand washing facilities are not available. Clothes should be laundered after all workouts.
  • Healthy Practices: All players and coaches should practice healthy habits including adequate hydration to keep mucous membranes moist, consume a varied, vitamin-rich diet with sufficient vegetables and fruits, and get adequate sleep.
  • Cleaning/Disinfecting: Sports Facility owners/operators and team staff should use disposable disinfectant wipes on all training areas, equipment, common areas, door handles, water fountains and bathrooms, etc. on a regular basis.
  • Self-quarantine: Players, coaches, parents, or spectators with any symptoms should not attend any training sessions or competitions.
  • Water Bottles: Water and sports drink jugs should no longer be provided by sports facilities or sports organizations. Athletes and coaches should bring their own water bottles to all team activities to help to reduce transmission risk. Individuals should take their own water bottles home each night for cleaning and sanitation. Visiting teams should also bring their own water bottles.
  • No Handshakes/Celebrations: Obviously with social distancing practices, players and coaches should refrain from handshakes, high fives, fist/elbow bumps, chest bumps, group celebrations, etc.
  • Sports Organization Staff: Many sports organizations are limiting staff exposure by limiting working at the office and non-essential travel. Staff is encouraged not to come into the office if they are not feeling well. Remote working from home is promoted as an alternative.
  • Returning From Out of Country: Those returning from a country with ongoing COVID-19 infections should monitor their health and follow the instructions from public health officials.
  • Meetings: Many sports organizations are cancelling in-person meetings and conferencing by telephone.
  • Conferences: Many sports organizations are changing member conference participation from in-person to video.
  • Limiting Spectator Attendance: Some sports organizations may choose to limit spectator risk by limiting attendance to essential staff and limited family members.
  • Coronavirus Warning Signage: Post conspicuous signage at sports facility warning of coronavirus risks and what steps can be taken to reduce such risks. Here is some sample language that should be reviewed by local legal counsel:
    • Coronavirus Risk Warning
      • It is suggested that seniors or others with compromised immune systems not participate in or attend this event due to risk of infection.
      • Do not enter if you are exhibiting any signs of illness such as sneezing, coughing, sniffles, have fever, or don’t feel well.
      • If you are repeatedly sneezing or coughing, you may be asked to immediately leave the premises.
      • All players, staff, and spectators should practice responsible social distancing by remaining at least 6 ft apart whenever possible.
      • All players, staff, and spectators should wear PPE such as face masks whenever applicable.
      • Wash your hands and/or use hand sanitizer upon entrance, during the event, before and after you eat, and as you leave. Hand washing and hand santizer stations are provided.
      • Avoid touching your face including your eyes, nose, and mouth.
      • Public restrooms should limit occupancy to one person at a time.
  • Waiver/Release: Waiver/release agreement forms should be updated to address the risk of communicable diseases such as COVID-19 in addition to injury. See our updated waiver/release agreements for minors and adults. In addition, we have a new, stand alone COVID-19 waiver/release for those sports organizations that already collected their normal waiver/release forms for the season.

Other insurance policies that may apply to coronavirus

Event Cancellation Insurance is a stand-alone policy that pays for certain financial loss if an event is cancelled, postponed, curtailed or relocated beyond the control of the policyholder. Covered perils may include, but are not limited to, hurricanes, earthquakes, severe/adverse weather, outbreak of communicable disease, terrorism, labor strikes, non-appearance of key people, and unavailability of the venue due to fires, floods or power outages

Though outbreaks of communicable disease are commonly covered under Event Cancellation policy forms, the two leading carriers have recently started to exclude (not cover) coronavirus on newly issued policies. One carrier is issuing a specific coronavirus exclusion, whereas the other considers it to be an excluded pre-existing condition. However, Event Cancellation policies issued prior to the addition of the recent coronavirus restrictions may not have a coronavirus exclusion.

Also note that even if a coronavirus exclusion does not exist, a claim would only be covered if it is not possible for the event to move forward due to travel restrictions, state or local ordinance restrictions, or the suspension of facility operations. These factors are beyond the control of the insured. It is not enough that the attendees or event organizers have a fear of traveling or of catching the virus and voluntarily make the decision to cancel or alter the event.

Directors & Officers Liability covers the business entity and its directors and officers against certain lawsuits alleging managerial negligence that results in economic damages or the violation of rights of others under state, federal, or constitutional law. It is possible that a decision involving the failure to anticipate the financial impact of coronavirus and to take appropriate action could result in economic damages to the business and a subsequent lawsuit by shareholders or other stakeholders against the negligent directors and officers. However, D&O carriers may attempt to deny such a claim because of the “bodily injury” exclusion that is found in D&O policies. Many claims adjusters will take the position that economic damages arising out of bodily injury (i.e. coronavirus sickness) are excluded. However, this position is already being challenged in the courts in other contexts and the ultimate results are unclear.

Worker’s Compensation / Employer’s Liability Insurance covers certain on-the-job injuries and occupational diseases to employees and uninsured subcontractors, including medical bills, lost wages, and disability awards. It’s possible that an infected employee could file a Workman’s Compensation claim. However, Worker’s Compensation Commissions in some states may take the position that a covered occupational disease must be one that is specific to employment and not an ordinary disease to which the general public is exposed outside of employment. An exception may be health care workers who are exposed as part of their employment.

Business Interruption.  Sports facility owners and other sports organizations that own buildings or insure contents may carry a Commercial Property policy. Commercial Property policies often include Business Interruption / Extra Expense insurance which provides coverage for loss of business income (lost profit plus continuing operating expenses) while operations are totally or partially shut down as a result of a covered loss to insured property.  Also provided is Extra Expense coverage for the additional and necessary expenses after a loss to the extent that they offset the Business Income loss. In order for Business Income coverage to be triggered, there must be a direct physical loss to the property that is being covered, whether it is building or contents.

Some Property policies may include a coverage called Contingent Business Interruption which can trigger coverage in the event that there is a covered loss to the premises of suppliers, customers, or key partners. This coverage does not require any such loss at the insured’s own premises.

It is doubtful that contamination of building and contents would be considered a direct physical loss that would trigger business interruption coverage. Also, many property policies include a virus or bacteria exclusion which would further restrict coverage.

In addition, the Property policy may include coverage for acts of civil authorities that restrict access to an area. If such coverage exists, this may trigger a covered Business Interruption claim.

Coverage for any of the above-referenced Business Interruption coverages is not certain. Each case will depend on its own unique facts. Furthermore, the outcome will be dependent on the policy form and the existence of certain bacteria or virus exclusions that may apply. However, these claims may at least be worth discussing.

Conclusion

This coronavirus resource page will be updated frequently as new information comes to light. The purpose is to provide a framework to think through the risks to help each sports organization make an informed decision regarding cancellation and/or mitigation of risk. In addition, any potential coronavirus claims should be turned into the insurance carrier so that the claims department can make the coverage determination.


Coronavirus Resources

CDC Coronavirus Disease Situation Summary

CDC Coronavirus FAQs

CDC Coronavirus Travel Information

CDC Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers

World Health Organization Coronavirus Disease Outbreak

4 Key Coronavirus Insurance Coverage Battlegrounds

US Olympic Paralympic Coronavirus Information for Team USA Athletes and Staff

Breaking Down Business Interruption: How Insurance Can and Cannot Mitigate Coronavirus Losses

Risk Insights – Preparing Your Event for Coronavirus

Coronavirus in the Workplace – Compliance Considerations for Employers

Does Business Income Insurance Cover Coronavirus Shutdowns?

P/C Insurers Put a Price Tag on Uncovered Coronavirus Business Interruption Losses

Businesses Fear Lawsuits from Sick Employees, Patrons After Reopening

How will youth sports return to play? USOPC offers first glimpse

Return to Play COVID-19 Risk Assessment Tool

Amateur baseball season still possible. !

Town Ball main
Members of the Mankato Twins watch from their dugout in a playoff game last season. The Twins’ season is on hold due to COVID-19.

The Minnesota baseball scene has many layers and levels.

A lot has been made of the cancelations and postponements in professional, college, high school and youth baseball … but what about the state’s most unique rung on the baseball ladder? What about town ball?

With 272 teams across the state, Minnesota is the nation’s hub for amateur baseball. However, with COVID-19 spreading, the amateur season is on hold just like the rest of the sports world.

And just as with other leagues and governing bodies, the Minnesota Baseball Association is still hoping to have some type of season.

“We realize there’s going to have to be changes made,” MBA President and Mankato resident Fred Roufs said. “That’s just the new world we live in.”

The MBA is considering many of the same changes as various youth organizations, including extended benches, no more sharing of equipment and social distancing of fans. When it comes to keeping fans apart, Roufs is very confident it can be done.

“We usually get between 25-100 people at games. We’re putting those into stadiums that could hold 250-1,000,” Roufs said. “We think we can social distance very easily in the majority of our ballparks. I think people will segregate themselves.”

When it comes to the games missed in May, those shouldn’t be a major issue. Many amateur baseball teams do a home-and-away, two-game series with each team in their respective league, and those can easily be turned into doubleheaders.

The big issue that’s looming will be the annual state tournament, which is set to take place in New Ulm and Springfield during the last two weeks in August. That event would bring 64 teams to those towns and is the highlight of the town-ball season.

It’s also a major expense, as the field in New Ulm has received about $2 million in upgrades for the tournament, while Springfield has gotten $600,000 according to Roufs.

“They’ve been working on preparations for the state tournament for four or five years, so they’re pretty anxious to go,” Roufs said.

For the Mankato Twins, who are part of the Minnesota Senior Men’s Amateur Baseball Association, this was supposed to be a big season. In only their first year as an 35-and-older team last season, the Twins made an incredible playoff run, eventually losing in the state championship.

With many of the same players back, along with a few new additions, the Twins were set to make another run. Manager Kris Brenke has already had to cancel three games in May, but he still has hopes to get on the field.

“For the most part, people seem like they’re itching to get out there and play,” Brenke said. “We’ve got some good players. We’re looking a little better this year.”

As far as a potential timeline for a return, Roufs doesn’t know for sure. Various leagues are planning for different scenarios, including start dates in June and July. However, he said South Dakota played its first town ball game of the season last weekend as a trial run, and that it apparently went well from a social distancing standpoint.

“The most important thing is that we need to make sure people keep their social distance, and that they stay safe,” Roufs said.

“We’re open to any suggestions the governor has. If he says ‘here’s the restrictions we have,’ we’ll figure out a way to make baseball work.”

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We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

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** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **

Bare Necessities: How to Preserve Your Field !

This is your guide to lockdown field maintenance.

As the country slowly begins to move toward reopening from the Covid-19 shutdown, those on the front lines of youth sports — specifically baseball and softball — are stuck in a wait-and-see mode. Left to the mercy of governors in each state, those of us involved understand that youth sports are not considered essential like other parts of the economy. Some states, such as Illinois, have already called off all youth sports for the summer and the governor is now contemplating the fate of fall sports there. No doubt, there will be other states and individual leagues that won’t see any action this summer.

But even if the sport is shutdown, fields will still need to be managed as they are living biosystems that will need attention. So what basic maintenance do you really need to be perform? How will these practices help to maintain or even improve the playing field for next spring season or fall ball ?

MOWING: This is pretty obvious but let’s dig in a little deeper. Whether your field is irrigated or not, raise the mowing height. Raise it more for unirrigated fields than irrigated. This will push the plant to lengthen its roots in the soil making it more drought tolerant going into the hot and dry summer months. Mow according to growth rate so that you are mowing off no more than 1/3 of the leaf blade off the plant.

IRRIGATION: If your field is outfitted with irrigation — be it manual or automatic — use it! Nothing helps thicken your turf more than water and a lack of play. No capitol project pays more dividends to your field than having an irrigation system installed. Not only will it help your turf, but when play does resume, it will also greatly improve the condition of your infield skin as well.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

We Can Save You Money In 2020 !

* ( 16 Different Amateur Sports ) *

( Teams, Officials, Tournaments, & Facilities ) *

1-800-622-7370

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

www.sadlersports.com/soda

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

www.sportsplexoperators.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 

“Proudly Serving The USA/Canada 

Since 1981”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

** “STAY HOME ** STAY SAFE” ** Stay Healthy **